Home > Accountant’s Copy, QuickBooks File Types > QuickBooks File Types

QuickBooks File Types

There are many ways you can work with a QuickBooks Expert. You can search for QuickBooks training resources online and of course you can hire us to help you. Once you’ve made that decision (and hopefully you’ve chosen us) we can work with your QuickBooks file in a number of ways.

Most e-mail servers will not allow attachments through if the size exceeds 10MB (megabytes). Some even limit you to 5. Because we are experts in both QuickBooks and Computers in general, we can really help you understand not just your QuickBooks file issues, but also how really work with your QuickBooks file in general. This is especially helpful in the context described here when you have hired a QuickBooks Pro such as myself and you want to be able to work with someone who can help you with QuickBooks and who also understands how to work with the file such that the integrity of your data is protected.

Here are the different QuickBooks File Types:

1) QBW – QuickBooks Working file.

This is the full fledged working copy of your file. This is going to be the largest in size; however as large file transfer services become more prevalent it is more common to send your QuickBooks file without even making a backup. For example on our Home Page http://www.nerdenterprises.com there is a link to a virtual drop box http://dropbox.yousendit.com/SethDavid766754 in which we encourage people to “drop” their QuickBooks file. Even the QuickBooks backup options described below create large files and so these services become helpful and even necessary. Visit http://www.yousendit.com for more info on the service we use.

2) QBM – QuickBooks Portable Company File (I don’t know where the ‘M’ comes from, seems to me it should be QBP)

When you choose to back up your QuickBooks file, the QuickBooks Portable Company File creates the smallest file size. The idea was to give it more transferability. This option takes the longest to create and the longest to restore. Based on what I’ve read from Intuit, it is also supposed to better preserve data integrity during transfer, however I have transferred many files over the years and more recently because of the yousendit service I have been transferring the complete QuickBooks file (QBW) and I have not had any problems yet. Nevertheless the options are there, so I talk about them for your benefit and so that you can decide which option is best for you. If you are very conservative and “worried” – this is the choice for you. My aim is generally at efficiency so in my case, this is not the best choice.

3) QBB – QuickBooks Backup

This is the old fashioned Backup file. I still like to use this one – especially when I transfer QuickBooks files frequently with clients as I often do. This enables me to maintain a history of the client’s QuickBooks file at various stages of my work. Oftentimes the nature of what I am hired to do for example is to completely re-purpose the Chart of Accounts. I will choose the option to append the name of the QuickBooks file with the date and time so that the files stack nicely in a folder that I often name “Old QuickBooks Files.” Usually I find that my frame of reference is in terms of when I did something to the file, so this makes it easy get to the right file.

4) The Accountant’s Copy

This enables you to work on your own file while your accountant works on it and the accountant’s changes can be imported. The way this works is that when you create the file, you have to set a dividing date. Let’s say you choose December 31. This will allow your accountant to change anything prior to Dec 31 while you can still enter and pay bills in your QuickBooks file. In the top title bar of the file you will see the words “Accountant’s Changes Pending.” This can work real well in many instances; however I have found it to be a bit buggy – especially where there are a lot of changes. My suggestion when using this is to import the changes frequently. The working copy can be released from the accountant’s changes in the event you do not need to import them. Also the accountant’s copy may be converted to a permanent QuickBooks working file (QBW). This is helpful if you haven’t made many changes, your accountant has, and if you are having trouble importing the changes.

Finally if you are stuck, you can send both files to Intuit (you have to call them) and they can fix this for you.

What about transferring from QuickBooks for MAC to QuickBooks for PC and vice versa?

Yes you can and have been able to do this since QB for Mac version 7, and QB for PC version 2007 (all editions, perhaps except for QuickBooks Simple Start).
It’s in the file menu under Utilities in QuickBooks for PC. In the MAC, I believe the choice is right there in the File menu so save a copy or save a backup copy for windows. Whichever direction you are converting you wind up with the equivalent of the “QBB” file. This of course has to be restored.

When you do round trip conversions, what will happen with your bank and credit card reconciliations initially is that it will look like the reconciliations were “undone.” All that has to be done is to go to reconcile the account, then enter the ending balance of the last statement that was reconciled in QuickBooks. You will see all of the previously “cleared” items come in checked off and your difference will be ‘0’. Just click ‘reconcile now’ and you’re done. When you are doing this, it is important to save your reconciliation reports as a PDF each time you reconcile (on the initial reconciliation, not on the round trip conversions). Please don’t waste paper – just save the PDF – you can print it only if/when you need it. Create a folder on your computer called “Bank of xxx reconciliation reports” and save them there. It’s easy and efficient.

More on this here: The Accountant’s Copy

Please feel free to reply to this post with any questions.

Seth David
President
Nerd Enterprises, Inc.
http://www.nerdenterprises.com

Advertisements
  1. March 1, 2010 at 5:49 PM

    Good explanations! One other thing about the portable file…the reason it is so much smaller is because it leaves out the internal indexing in the file. That’s why it takes longer to create: more data processing.

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: